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Storytelling through sculptures with Sarah. Fibre Artist Feature

I am sitting here cursing myself that I haven't shared more of Sarah's incredible pieces until now. Truth be, I have been sitting on this for a while, when it was added to my list of things I wanted to do at the start of the year. I am finally relieved to be getting to Sarah's story and to share some of her amazing, artistic work with you all.


Sarah is one of my international customers, who found me while searching for some of the more unusual yarns a couple of years ago.. It was our range of nettle and hemp yarns that connected the dots. These kinds of natural plant based yarns can be difficult to work with and I have found from experience people either love them or hate them. Sarah is some one who loves them and has found her own special style of work that embraces their rustic qualities.


Although Sarah weaves in a traditional sense as well, the work I love the most, are her totem and sculptural pieces. Each piece has a story to tell. and they combine a range of different techniques and materials including hand dyed fabrics, stitching and weaving in the process.


Lets go meet Sarah.


Tell us in a few sentences a little bit about yourself:

I am originally from the State of Louisiana, USA. I lived in Colorado for sometime and retired to Santa Fe, New Mexico in 2019. I’ve been married to my husband, a retired furniture maker, for 27 years. I have two wonderful daughters, a terrific son-in-law and two of the best grand children ever. And, I can’t forget my weaving buddy, Louie, the golden retriever.


My casita is set up as my studio and I work there most days. I wake up very early and enjoy watching the world wake up from my window. I have two frame looms, similar to modified Navajo looms that I designed and my husband made. I can adjust them up or down and tilt. I prefer to stand while weaving. One of these is in the casita and the other in the living room. I quite often have projects on both.

I work in both weaving and textile sculptures and totems.


Please share one random/ interesting fact about you.

I believe in keeping family history alive. Everyday I look at the piece of quilt that we were able to restore that was made by my great, great, great grandmother (1834-1910). I am in awe of the tiny stitches.


Almost daily I use the cotton cards that belonged to my great, great, great grandfather (1830-1899)


Which fibre art/s has sent you down the rabbit hole?

Because I do a lot of collage with my weaves and add small items to my totems, I love seeking out antique stores, junk shops, consignment stores and rock and gem shows.


I can easily find myself with a box of semi-precious stones, buttons, vintage trade beads or a stack of Kuba cloth. More often than not, I have no idea what I’m going to use these items for.

How long have you been creating?

I come from a family of makers. I really don’t remember when I was not making something. My grandmother insisted that I learn embroidery and sewing. I got my first loom in 1979.


This photo shows my lineage of makers. This is me as a baby, my Mother (1931-2015), my Grandmother (1905-1979), my Great Grandmother (1876-1954). All of their dresses were made by them. Note that the pattern is the same for Great Grandmother and Grandmother. This was the everyday dress pattern.


Generation of makers

How/Why did you get into it?

How could I not with my family of influencers!


What are your future fibre goals?

I’m working toward improving techniques.

What is it about fibre art that makes you love it the way you do?

I like the lessons of fiber art...patience, calm, everything can be fixed.


What is your most challenging piece to date? Pics would be amazing.

The pieces that are on the loom the longest are the biggest challenge. Either because they are large or the yarn is so thin (like nettle and hemp). Here is Chaos, a nettle, raffia and jute piece and Turquoise Trail, recycled cotton with lots of smaller weaves attached. All my pieces are named and a story with description is attached.

What is your most challenging piece to date? Pics would be amazing.

The pieces that are on the loom the longest are the biggest challenge. Either because they are large or the yarn is so thin (like nettle and hemp). Here is Chaos, a nettle, raffia and jute piece and Turquoise Trail, recycled cotton with lots of smaller weaves attached. All my pieces are named and a story with description is attached.


How have you learnt your craft - self-taught, workshops, books, online tutorials?

Self-taught


Do you have a favourite book or tutorial you would recommend?

I love Spider Woman’s Children. I am awestruck by the Native American weavers.

What fibre artist inspires you the most?

For inspiration, Jude Hill of Spiritcloth. Clothwhispering.com


In my opinion, the best pattern maker around is Ann Wood. Annwoodhandmade.com


Her designs are incredible. I use both her crow and owl pattern. Having made patterns myself, I can tell you that hers are detailed, precise and the photos are excellent.

What would you say to someone who is thinking about getting into the craft but isn’t sure?

Find a needle, a bit of cloth, some thread and just start.


Best Tip or Trick?

I can not work without tiny needle-nose plyers, hemostats and chopsticks.


What is your favourite knot/technique to do? Why

99% of my weaves are plain or tabby and the overhand knot. I let the weave be the foundation and add to it, quite often with another weave or wraps.


Neutrals or colour?

Mostly neutrals or muted colors.

Are you drawn to pattern or texture?

Texture

sculpture art
Spirit Raven Sculpture

What would you say is your style? Geometric, boho etc

Boho folk art with ethnic vibe


What is your favourite VADA BLUE fibre to use and why?

The nettle is my favorite. I prefer the bast or plant fibers over wools. Probably because I am a gardener and have that connection. Although it is like weaving with sewing thread, the result is great.


Where can you find your work? Ie: online, markets, website, shop?

I am not really interested in a lot of social media. It makes me anxious. I show several times a year at Rancho de las Golondrinas in Santa Fe, NM. It is a living history museum that dates to the 1700s. I love that they have demonstrations on ranch activities like sheep shearing, spinning, dying and weaving. 2022 was their 50th year as the museum.


I have an open studio event and contact collectors individually who have bought from me before and expressed interest in staying in touch.

Word of mouth is the best.

If you have a social media account – let us know.


FB - Sarah Lindblad

Please jump onto Sarah's social media accounts and show her some love for her wonderful pieces of art. Below I have included some more of her designs with descriptions working L-R.

  1. A nettle piece with porcupine quills

  2. Collages in shadow boxes.

  3. Pony with nettle mane and tail

  4. One of my favorite pieces with nettle is Windhover. Carved Krestrel feather is a David Hall design.

  5. Here is my latest sculpture piece (Ann Wood crow) and a totem.


Sarah really does work wanders with the nettle yarn. If you would like to experience nettle yarn for yourself, you can check it out below.



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